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Teacher Newsmagazine Volume 17, Number 3, November/December 2004

Looking back

70 years ago

Good discipline is necessary to obtain the best results in classroom procedure. Discipline is a matter of proper relationships between teacher and class. It is a question of all living together in harmony and working steadily toward the objectives of school education. All requirements and decisions must be reasonable and fair; i.e., in the interests of the pupils. Fairness does not mean treating all children alike. For example, the sensitive child needs different treatment from the self-confident one. Discipline is not keeping order; it is effective leadership. The efficient teacher is not a dictator but the leader of a social group.

The BC Teacher, November 1934

50 years ago

Unless the peoples of the earth succeed in building a world government within the next decade or so, civilization is very probably doomed. The imperative need for world citizenship has been thrust upon us by the inexorable course of events, without any regard for our acceptance of it or our qualifications for it. That we are not now qualified for world citizenship is shown by the fact that we are at present drifting toward atomic warfare faster than toward world government. To say that the blame for our present drift toward war lies with some other country, such as Russia, is to ignore the axiom that it takes two sides to make a quarrel.

The BC Teacher, December 1954

30 years ago

What’s in this term? my cynical teacher friend inquired. "I remember away back 12 to 14 years ago when it was Bruner, the structure of the discipline, and the teaching of it in an intellectually honest manner. About 10 years ago, it was programmed learning—or was it programmed instruction? Then, about 8 years ago, it was team teaching—or was it co-operative, or parallel teaching? After that, things really speeded up, and we had open areas, and next it was outdoor education and environmental education—I know that they were different, though I can’t quite remember how. Then we had multidisciplinary studies and interdisciplinary studies—but I never knew what the difference was. Last term it was open classroom, or family grouping, or multigrade grouping."

The BC Teacher, December 1974

10 years ago

We have long held the conviction that the empowerment of teachers through technology would result in greater learning opportunities for students. Unfortunately, in most districts technology for students has preceded technology for teachers. This has slowed the implementation and appreciation of these tools in our nation’s schools. Teachers will spend time learning computer software and the use of other technology only when they are convinced it will make a difference to them and to their students.

Teacher, Nov./Dec. 1994

– Chris Bocking, Keating Elementary School, Saanich